breast-cancerOctober is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which is an annual campaign to increase awareness of the disease. While most people are aware of breast cancer, many forget to take the steps to have a plan to detect the disease in its early stages and encourage others to do the same. We have made a lot of progress but still have a long way to go and need your help!

You may be wondering how you can help.  Let me plant some seeds in your mind.

  1. Wear something pink to show your support for breast cancer awareness month. When you join the hundreds of thousands of people who take part in wearing pink, you become part of a collective force of scientists, supporters and people affected by breast cancer.
  2. Learn how to do your monthly breast self exam and stick to your schedule.  If you are female, the best time is 7-10 days after your period.  If you are male  or a female who is no longer having a period, choose a time in the month to do it and stick to the schedule.
  3. Remind other people to do their monthly BSE,
  4. If you are over 40, schedule a mammogram.

 

1- The first, and most common, sign of breast cancer is a LUMP IN THE BREAST – 9% of these lumps are benign and confused with cysts. Breast cysts are sacs of fluid in the breast tissue, which are quite common.

2- A LUMP OR THICKENED AREA in either breast or in the underarm area, it can be detected by regular self-examination for breast cancer .

3- A CHANGE IN SIZE OR SHAPE of one or both breasts.

4- PAIN in either breast or armpit unrelated to your period.

5- DISCHARGES

-Coming from either nipple, it may be bloody, or Milky, if present when not breastfeeding you should be checked by a doctor right away.

6- DIMPLING

-Dimpling or sunken skin on your breasts, often referred to as “orange-peel,” from similarity of appearance

7- RASHES AND REDNESS

-Rashes around your nipple

-Redness or an enlarged underarm lymph node

In breast cancer the outcome depends on how soon the cancer is diagnosed. So it’s very important to do self-examination and encourage other women to do so too. Lump, hard knot or thickening inside the breast or underarm area

  • Swelling, warmth, redness or darkening of the breast
  • Change in the size or shape of the breast
  • Dimpling or puckering of the skin
  • Itchy, scaly sore or rash on the nipple
  • Pulling in of your nipple or other parts of the breast
  • Nipple discharge that starts suddenly
  • New pain in one spot that doesn’t go away

 

About wear it pink

When you join the hundreds of thousands of people who take part in wear it pink, you become part of a collective force of scientists, supporters and people affected by breast cancer. Together, by funding cutting-edge research, our aim is to ensure no one dies from breast cancer by 2050.