Business in Focus: Kings Garments

Ever thought of getting the perfectly tailored suit for a special occasion, or just tired of your jeans waist not fitting properly while the other areas are just a perfect trim?

Well, with his motto of ’efficiency and durability’ with the people in mind, one tailor/vendor in town is here to supply those needs.

Located in Pottersville, a mere 10-minute walk from the city of Roseau, Kings Garments sit as a cozy-like sewing shop on Steber Street.  Run by an amicable Haitian-Dominican Petit-Louis Acceus, Kings Garments specializes in all that involves sewing: men and women clothing, chair-covering, outside jobs, repairs, and renting of jackets.

Plus, ever had to go to a function and after walking all over town just settle for a shabby dress?

The King

No more, Petit-Louis, who likes to be called “King”, and his staffm, will cut that dress or suit for you and hand it back to you within hours.  Oh yes, you can just sit and wait.  Don’t need to go through the hustle to get cloth, they also provide the material, in other words one could just place his/her order and later pick up.

As was the financial difficulty in starting up the business, King says that presently also, the same problem of allocating funds poses itself now that he is ready for expansion. Presently having a staff of eight persons, this small business entrepreneur is still looking towards to helping even more persons gain employment through opening their own sewing shops.

King’s future goal is to offer classes where persons can learn various sewing skills.

About Business In Focus
The purpose of this feature is to showcase businesses in Dominica to the local and international market, so readers can know a little bit more about their products, services and history. This is also a way of helping businesses in Dominica to strengthen the image of their product and boost sales.

How do I get my business featured?

Any business can be featured – once you have at least a one-month advertising ongoing campaign with us, we will send a reporter to do a feature on your business, or you can do it yourself and send us your photos and article for publication on our homepage and in our special section.  There is no cost associated with producing the article and photos.

Who do I contact?
Contact our sales/office manager Mrs. Glenda Nicholas-Samuel at 440-7588 or email advertising@dominicanewsonline.com.

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19 Comments

  1. naughty
    September 18, 2011

    Mr- kings is good men ‘the best

    :-| :cry:

  2. syborg55
    February 18, 2010

    To us Dominicans who lives and work in America,I’d say that roughly 90% of us are still as small minded as we were when we first left Dominica. Question,do you people read the CRAP you write when commenting on anything? If I didn’t know that we as Dominicans are actually intelligent people,I would swear that those comments are being made by people who walks around like empty Headed Zumbies… You Guys whine like little B**ches,both Men and Women,you are making us the PAPPYSHOW of the Islands… Live and let Live!

  3. EMPRESS america
    February 17, 2010

    i am a west indian, there is no african about me , i was born in dominica and living in america
    i am a dominicanamerican.

  4. miss joseph
    January 24, 2010

    Well I was born in dominica, but I live in America, I an not an africian American. because american are confused of who they are, and are looking for iDENITY. tHEy USED TO BE CALLED nEGROES, THEN COLOURED, AND SO ON. All I want to be called is BlACK. I don”t get into the mess in the USA of who I am

  5. brutalw
    January 12, 2010

    hey peps ur boy is back. i really am amazed by the great work kings have going on in da. just saturday i went there and i saw 4 pants done in less that 16 mintues.
    thats amazing for all my clothing needs i go at kings gament.

  6. mr king is in the future
    January 11, 2010

    whoever have that camera needs to change the date lol mr king living in the future lol hahahahahahahaha 2075/08/21 wtf? i suspect thats a haitian voodoo camera

  7. chemist
    January 11, 2010

    @ African-American
    Note I do have my facts straight ok!!! Note we are all aware that Americans of negro decent are called African-Americans …..I never said that they are not!!! The are Americans!!!! Why should the term “American” be limited to just those who are Caucasian. And of course Dominicas and other caribbean national will be considered to be West Indian…. or afro- caribbean in some instances because they are just too many islands in the caribbean to be that specific

  8. mouth of the south
    January 11, 2010

    i know mr acceus n i can tell u he’s one person u can definitely count on to get the job done,,,, it however amazes me how mr acceus can jus take over that market in dominica in jus roughly 2 yrs,,, so many shops around roseau,,, dominicans in business,,, there are 3 important things,,,, location,price and MARKETING,,, i had to put it in block letters cause we fail miserably,,,, but nonetheless most of allu have better location that petit louis,,, its jus that he markets much better and is very reliable,,,,,,

    • Hollaout
      June 13, 2012

      DOMINICANS ARE STILL SLAVES IN THINKING..THATS WHY THE COUNTRY IS SLOW TO PROGRESS. PEOPLE FROM ABRAOD HAVE TO COME BACK AND SHOW THEM HOW TO DO THINGS PROPERLY. IMAGINE WHAT THIS GUY HAS DONE IN 2 YERS AND DOMINICANS BEEN IN DOMINICA ALL THEIR LIVES AND NOTHING GREAT HAS BEEN BUILT. EVEN THE CHINESE HAD TO COME AND BUILD YOUR ROADS AND AGAIN ANOTHER COUTNRY HAD TO BUILD YOUR AIRPORTS…SHAME DOMINICA, AND THEN YOU HAVE ALL THESE SO CALLE EXPERTS CHATTING SHIT ALL THE TIME ON YOUR POORLY RUN TV CHANNEL LIKE MARPIN NEWS…WHAT CRAP, SHAME ON YOU DOMINICA. GET YOUR SHIT TOGETHER BEFORE YOU START TO CRITICISE OTHER PEOPLE.

  9. African-American
    January 11, 2010

    To chemist

    Just wanted to clarify something. All negros born in the US are called African Americans. As long as they are black, they are considered African Americans. Those from africa living in the US are just considered Africans. Please get your facts right ok? And I would be considered a West Indian being born in Dominca and living in the US. I am not Dominican- American even though i have citizenship.

  10. W. Wansborough
    January 11, 2010

    This business news item is positive and encouraging. An inspired presentation by DNO, just what is needed for the new year.

    Mr Petit-Louis is an example of the kind of person Dominica needs to attract – industrious people. I don’t think we need to hyphenate his national identity as Dominican-Haitian though. Some people they might be immigrants to Dominica to start with but in reality they are really a part of us. It will not be very long until they, especially the young school children, become naturalized Dominicans just like every body else.

    We must avoid segregating people unnecessarily into sub-nationality. This can cause social and racial enclaves to take root in Dominica. That’s what happens when you wrongly hyphenate people into social groupings. They do that sort of thing in America and to a lesser extent, in Britain where the white people feel uncomfortable about making certain types of foreigners feel ‘at home’. But we have seen the consequences of that kind of policy. Such development can be divisive in undermining the cohesion of Dominica’s society.

    For those who just see the negative side of everything, this is how industry grows. In a couple of years that business can expand to provide exports which leads to the need to employ more people and other types of businesses. Economic growth happens because efforts like Mr petit’s, is replicated throughout society. Many people who are giants in the world of finance and business have very humble origins which was based on a simple idea.

    We can learn by seeing what others do.

    Dominicans should feel proud that we make a democratic system work well enough for foreign people to want to settle amongst us. You can’t say that for every where in the world.

    Well done Dominica!!

  11. January 10, 2010

    Am happy for you mr KING. You get the opportunity, grasp it and make good
    use of it.

  12. chemist
    January 10, 2010

    @ I am mad…nothing is wrong with calling them haitian-dominica….the first nationality is Haitian ….therefore if the become a citizen of Dominica they shall be haitian dominica…which clearly indicates their nationality. Its not like in the U.S where you have Americans who are born and raised in the US being called African Americans because of their skin… they are not….African Americans…are people who have been born in Africa but have since migrated to the US where they became citizens.

    I commend DNO who showcasing small businesses in Dominica..keep up the good work!!

  13. Dominican
    January 10, 2010

    There is nothing wrong with Haitian-Dominican! Even if our new comers are becoming Dominicans, I am sure that they will be Haitians the rest of their lives in their hearts ( and they have the right to feel so towards the land of their birth). After all, we Dominicans living outside of Dominica do carry the identities of these new lands but will forever be Dominicans.

    Let me take this time to welcome these new brothers and sisters to Dominica. If you are skillful, ready to work hard, ready to help build Dominica (your new home), then welcome!!

    • dominican flower
      March 20, 2010

      @Dominican…I tottaly agree with you….

  14. Prophet2
    January 10, 2010

    IMHO, Dominica has been stalled since independence and I blame it on all past and present governments, we have 3 decades to catch-up so it’s either gonna have to be rapid development or we’ll stay in spinning mode trying to catch our tails.
    There will be no progress if we don’t understand that the government is our enterprise, it’s our tax money that pay them, we elect them so they work for us and we have to demand more from them.

    I say it’s time to get our tails out from between our legs, it’s been too long.

    DNO please post.

  15. Poosky
    January 10, 2010

    thats good!

  16. lightbulb
    January 10, 2010

    I like this.
    Featuring local business, I hope local business people seize the opportunity

  17. I am mad
    January 10, 2010

    Haitian-Dominican? They have all the rights that we do, in our own country, so just call them what they are. Dominicans.

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